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Does Schizophrenia Correlate With Genius?

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Thinker13
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Posted 07/20/12 - 1:48 PM:
Subject: Does Schizophrenia Correlate With Genius?
Psychosis

Information in the form of electrical signals flows down nerve cells in the brain, triggering the release of neurotransmitters. These chemical messengers transmit information from one nerve cell to another. In healthy people, neurotransmitter traffic usually flows smoothly, with occasional hills, valleys, bumps, and potholes that represent the stresses and challenges of growing up and interacting with other people. In people with schizophrenia, however, neurotransmitter traffic runs into major roadblocks, unscheduled stops, and unmapped detours to frightening and unreal places. These traffic disruptions result in periods of psychosis, during which people with schizophrenia lose touch with healthy reality and seem to get trapped in alternate realities. With anti-psychotic medication, people with schizophrenia often find their way back to the healthy realities of everyday life.



Read more: Schizophrenia - catch, body, last, causes www.humanillnesses.com/Beha...renia.html#b#ixzz21BpRzRlt



Funny thing is--there are no 'realities of everyday life.' Like all other things western, war-on-schizophrenia has distorted world-view.

Does an extraordinarily rich awareness of stream of perceptions not translate as "genius," if tried to tame a bit?

What is knowledge and intelligence if not the memory(consciousness)?

The retention of perceptions and their associations could render a schizophrenic a genius methinks.

What are your ideas on this?
Thinker13
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Posted 07/20/12 - 1:56 PM:

Two more general questions:

Does Schizophrenia correlate well with paranoia? What about raptures, ecstasy and run-on sentences?

I asked about run-on sentences because I observed those in one of our acquaintances who seems to be suffering from it.

I think, attention span and clarity of imagery we receive might be related to run-on sentences, or it's- more than just a 'bad habit'?


Compare two common writers who have written for enough long:smiling face

Henry and Starjade:

Henry has a very good punctuation and Starjade doesn't care for punctuation but just rushes with his stream of imagery. Both of them are eloquent speakers; both of them have vivid imaginations which often get violent and Starjade's sense of humor seems to be more wild and Henry's sober.

What do you make of it?
libertygrl
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Posted 07/20/12 - 1:57 PM:

I would say that schizophrenia is present in many geniuses, but that genius is absent in many schizophrenics.

Genius is not only the ability to tap into the profundities of perception but also the ability to make something useful and coherent out of it. This ability is absent in many, not just in schizophrenics but also people with linear thinking and very reason-based cognitive ability.
Thinker13
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Posted 07/20/12 - 2:19 PM:

libertygrl wrote:
I would say that schizophrenia is present in many geniuses, but that genius is absent in many schizophrenics.

Genius is not only the ability to tap into the profundities of perception but also the ability to make something useful and coherent out of it. This ability is absent in many, not just in schizophrenics but also people with linear thinking and very reason-based cognitive ability.



But don't you think that 'creative manifestation' and 'coherent conversion' of perceptions is not an absolutely important aspect of Genius unless you suggest that genius is only the one which is rewarded by society because of its usefulness to it?


I think experiences themselves which confer happiness to the subject might be considered means as well as ends of creativity?
libertygrl
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Posted 07/20/12 - 2:24 PM:

They certainly might, although if they do, we're not likely to hear or know about it due to the extreme subjectivity of the experience.
Thinker13
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Posted 07/20/12 - 2:30 PM:

libertygrl wrote:
They certainly might, although if they do, we're not likely to hear or know about it due to the extreme subjectivity of the experience.



Then, they're geniuses in the eye of God if any such view exists. smiling face

But you did not answer about Schizophrenia thinking patterns. Is it more images or otherwise, does it relate to paranoia and other things?
libertygrl
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Posted 07/20/12 - 2:36 PM:

Oh, I missed seeing your post that came in while I was composing my reply.

Schizophrenia is known in the field of psychiatry as a "spectrum disorder". There are many different facets of it and for some it may be a mostly visual phenomenon while for others it may be strictly auditory. Paranoia is a facet for some and not for others. The DSM-IV, which Kin has mentioned before in another topic, is the American standard for diagnosing schizophrenia and other so-called mental illnesses. I say so-called because in my view, it is not always a matter of illness (although sometimes it is).

A person can be bipolar schizophrenic, paranoid schizophrenic, schizoaffective - there's a long list of categories. Primary manifestations of schizophrenia may include "thought disorder", auditory or visual hallucinations, "delusions", etc. I have delusions in quotes because in some cases it may be debatable whether the person is truly delusional. Some schizophrenics may suffer from some symptoms and not others. It varies greatly.

Edited by libertygrl on 07/20/12 - 2:41 PM
Thinker13
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Posted 07/20/12 - 2:48 PM:

libertygrl wrote:
Oh, I missed seeing your post that came in while I was composing my reply.

Schizophrenia is known in the field of psychiatry as a "spectrum disorder". There are many different facets of it and for some it may be a mostly visual phenomenon while for others it may be strictly auditory. Paranoia is a facet for some and not for others. The DSM-IV, which Kin has mentioned before in another topic, is the American standard for diagnosing schizophrenia and other so-called mental illnesses. I say so-called because in my view, it is not always a matter of illness (although sometimes it is).

A person can be bipolar schizophrenic, paranoid schizophrenic, schizoaffective - there's a long list of categories. Primary manifestations of schizophrenia may include "thought disorder", auditory or visual hallucinations, "delusions", etc. I have delusions in quotes because in some cases it may be debatable whether the person is truly delusional. Some schizophrenics may suffer from some symptoms and not others. It varies greatly.



It's not scientific assessment at all, but part of my motivation to ask the question was to see if I fit the category somehow. I have observed that I interact well with Starjade, you and Kin and it's not a coincidence that I considered my father a Schizophrenic for enough long in my childhood because of his mood swings. I think that I inherited Schizophrenia, but then as I have never ever been to a psychiatrist. { I think I have tried to play a psychiatrist to some of the people sometimes and so have they to me but I am not much 'for' clinics. smiling face}



Edit: I have also been a dramatic pattern seeker(some of them too absolutely useless sticking out tongue ) and I think my reading of stories at a very young age for very long hours shaped my imagination about universe(s) and world. A story in which Nachiketa, a character in Mahabharata talks to Death impressed me most and introduced word 'Moksha' to me. Since then I have been searching Truth but then no more.

Do I fit the profile?
Is anxiety related strongly to Schizophrenia?

Edited by Thinker13 on 07/20/12 - 2:52 PM
libertygrl
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Posted 07/20/12 - 2:52 PM:

Well, if you check out my website http://www.theschizophreniamyth.com, you'll see that I believe we're all schizophrenic to some degree.

If you are simply inclined toward abstraction but not to such a degree that it impairs your ability to work or take care of yourself, I doubt any psychiatrist would attribute you the diagnosis of schizophrenia.
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Posted 07/20/12 - 2:54 PM:

P.S. Anxiety is a very common human condition, not peculiar to any one particular disorder, although extreme anxiety has its own disorder named for it.
libertygrl
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Posted 07/20/12 - 2:56 PM:

P.P.S. If you suffer from auditory hallucinations, then that alone is enough for an (American) psychiatrist to diagnose you as schizophrenic. Which to me is interesting because many if not most notable individuals spoken of in the Bible have been described as having this characteristic.
Thinker13
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Posted 07/20/12 - 2:56 PM:

libertygrl wrote:
Well, if you check out my website http://www.theschizophreniamyth.com, you'll see that I believe we're all schizophrenic to some degree.

If you are simply inclined toward abstraction but not to such a degree that it impairs your ability to work or take care of yourself, I doubt any psychiatrist would attribute you the diagnosis of schizophrenia.



'Impairs' is a relative word I must say. I have expressed difficulty in getting along in a new group especially because I tend to overlook trivia altogether and dig roots too often, or I become hell-bent at observing 'trivia.' It takes me some time and effort to really start interacting at a level where 'balance' is palpable.

libertygrl
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Posted 07/20/12 - 2:58 PM:

By "impairs" I mean that it keeps you from being able to (work or take care of yourself). If you are able to work but have social challenges, that is not as serious a concern (to a psychiatrist) as someone who cannot work at all, who does not sleep or bathe or feed themselves as needed.
Thinker13
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Posted 07/20/12 - 3:00 PM:

libertygrl wrote:
P.P.S. If you suffer from auditory hallucinations, then that alone is enough for an (American) psychiatrist to diagnose you as schizophrenic. Which to me is interesting because many if not most notable individuals spoken of in the Bible have been described as having this characteristic.



Thanks a lot. I have superb auditory hallucinations. laughing

I have even tried to inculcate it in my friends who have practiced meditation with me.

The Natha sect of India, who were worshipers of Shiva have practiced it for attaining Moksha.

I obtained my first Samadhi in my college using this method of meditation.

All yogis, prophets and avatars are schizophrenics then as you have already mentioned. laughing

What is the name of disorder for extreme anxiety and how you do you know about it so well?
Thinker13
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Posted 07/20/12 - 3:04 PM:

libertygrl wrote:
By "impairs" I mean that it keeps you from being able to (work or take care of yourself). If you are able to work but have social challenges, that is not as serious a concern (to a psychiatrist) as someone who cannot work at all, who does not sleep or bathe or feed themselves as needed.



Oh, I see. Then, your suggestion on your website that everyone suffers from it up to an extent is most appropriate.
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Posted 07/20/12 - 3:21 PM:

Here is a link on auditory hallucinations that you may find informative:

ajp.psychiatryonline.org/ar...ticle.aspx?articleid=96783

About anxiety, I have a number of friends who have suffered from severe anxiety disorders at one time or another. Here is another link with information:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anxiety_disorder

Based on what you have described, I would not characterize you as schizophrenic in the commonly used sense based on the American standard for diagnosis. Your auditory hallucinations can be explained by meditation, and your ability to work and care for yourself is apparently not greatly impaired.

By the American standard, let me give you a description of some hypothetical individuals who would be diagnosed as schizophrenic.

1) Tom. He hears voices in his head that he can't escape. Sometimes the voices tell him to do terrible things, like to kill his family. If he's lucky, he may know not to act on what the voices tell him, but not every schizophrenic has that amount of discernment. Consider for example the character of Nathaniel from the movie "The Soloist".

2) Mary. She sees hallucinatory images which she is unable to distinguish from reality. Consider for example the story of John Nash, of "A Beautiful Mind". Also the character of Teddy from "Shutter Island".

3) Richard. He is convinced that aliens are using the public radio to project unwanted thoughts into his brain. Consider the lyrics of the song "Blood for poppies" by Garbage.

These are just a few examples. Things like abstract thought, ambivalence, eccentricity, and other things that may come across to some people as "weird" at times are, alone, not useful indicators of a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia, although you are probably likely to find these traits in a schizophrenic individual.
Thinker13
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Posted 07/20/12 - 3:29 PM:

Thanks that helped.
thedoc
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Posted 07/20/12 - 4:02 PM:

Thinker13, you stated above that you have read the Mahabharata. There is a movie version of it, what is your opinion of the movie? I had a copy of the movie on video, and have thought about trying to obtain another copy.
Thinker13
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Posted 07/20/12 - 4:44 PM:

thedoc wrote:
Thinker13, you stated above that you have read the Mahabharata. There is a movie version of it, what is your opinion of the movie? I had a copy of the movie on video, and have thought about trying to obtain another copy.



I have read a few stories but cannot suggest that I have read all of it. I have seen some episodes of Mahabharata but I can say that the quality of direction and over-all experience might be 'poor.' Hollywood might have treated those stories like The Avenger and other blockbusters.
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Posted 07/20/12 - 11:05 PM:

Thinker13 wrote:



I have read a few stories but cannot suggest that I have read all of it. I have seen some episodes of Mahabharata but I can say that the quality of direction and over-all experience might be 'poor.' Hollywood might have treated those stories like The Avenger and other blockbusters.


I do not think it was a Hollywood production, it was broadcast on PBS and may have been produced in India. It was about 3 1/2 hours long.
Thinker13
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Posted 07/21/12 - 4:49 AM:

thedoc wrote:


I do not think it was a Hollywood production, it was broadcast on PBS and may have been produced in India. It was about 3 1/2 hours long.



I wanted to say that it was an Indian TV series of many episodes. I am not aware of the film. smiling face
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Posted 07/21/12 - 7:38 AM:

Thinker13 wrote:



I wanted to say that it was an Indian TV series of many episodes. I am not aware of the film. smiling face



Now that I look into it, I think the series was what I say but it was shown all at one time withour breaks, so had the appearance of a single movie.
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