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The Birthplace of Religions

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Thinker13
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Posted 07/01/12 - 6:03 AM:
Subject: The Birthplace of Religions
Wikipedia wrote:
Asia is the world's largest and most populous continent, with millions of different peoples following a wide variety of different religions. Asia was the birthplace of most of the world's mainstream religions including Buddhism, Confucianism, Judaism, Hinduism, Christianity, Lingayatism, Jainism, Sikhism, Taoism, Islam, Zoroastranism as well as many other beliefs.



Why do you think that Asia was birth place of so many mainstream religions?

Today, we find that adherents of religions are found all across the globe. In some cases, like Christianity, adherents outside Asia heavily outnumber Asian adherents.

What factors are responsible for some religions becoming popular in some places?

thedoc
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Posted 07/01/12 - 7:28 AM:

The current theory is that humans evolved in Africa and migrated into Asia and then the rest of the world. Mythology was probably born in Africa or Asia and being the origin of religion Asia would be the location where most religions started to be formed from the Mythology.
SUNLIGHT
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Posted 07/01/12 - 7:52 AM:

thedoc wrote:
The current theory is that humans evolved in Africa and migrated into Asia and then the rest of the world. Mythology was probably born in Africa or Asia and being the origin of religion Asia would be the location where most religions started to be formed from the Mythology.


..........................................
if by humans you mean man as we know him in shape and form today doc then NO!he did not evolve in AFRICA ..the BIBLE states that 2 rivers ran through the place where ADAM and eve lived , they are names as the river EUPRATES abd the river TIGRIS which are still there today and they run through IRAQ not AFRICA smiling face.
KinNaoko90
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Posted 07/01/12 - 7:57 AM:

I'd have to agree with doc. The earliest "human"'s remains were found in Africa. Since it is unlikely that humanity had the knowledge or resources at the time to travel across the Atlantic, they probably migrated to the Middle East then spread out to settle in Europe and other countries in Asia. As they were migrating their civilization likely became more organized through uses of mythology and eventually religion.

Since humanity spread from Africa in it's infancy, there may not have been any religion at the time, just mythology. I'd say that it is because of timing that the majority of religions came from Asia.

KinNaoko90
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Posted 07/01/12 - 8:20 AM:

SUNLIGHT wrote:

if by humans you mean man as we know him in shape and form today doc then NO!he did not evolve in AFRICA ..the BIBLE states that 2 rivers ran through the place where ADAM and eve lived , they are names as the river EUPRATES abd the river TIGRIS which are still there today and they run through IRAQ not AFRICA smiling face.


Sun, this is part of the mythology that was created by humanity. Also, I'm sure if you look on a map you can find that there are many places where two rivers run near each other and/or join with each other. The Bible can't have named the rivers Adam and Eve were born near, since the naming of the rivers happened during (I believe) the Sumerian Civilization. They are estimated to have settled there between 4500 and 4000 B.C. That means humanity existed long before then. Since Adam and Eve are estimated by most to have lived 6000 some-odd years ago, this is at odds with history since humankind predates that. smiling face

-Kin heart
thedoc
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Posted 07/01/12 - 11:09 AM:

Kin, just a brief note of explination, Sun reads the bible literally and has no understanding of Mythology. There is no point in arguing with him, he'll just quote some scripture as the literal and absolute truth. Just take it with a very large dose of salt, and tell him a joke.
KinNaoko90
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Posted 07/01/12 - 8:56 PM:

thedoc wrote:
Kin, just a brief note of explination, Sun reads the bible literally and has no understanding of Mythology. There is no point in arguing with him, he'll just quote some scripture as the literal and absolute truth. Just take it with a very large dose of salt, and tell him a joke.


I've been trying to do just that. wink But I can never resist a debate, no matter who the person is and what they believe/understand.
thedoc
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Posted 07/02/12 - 7:09 AM:

I used to feel that it was important to speak the truth as I knew it, but too many times someone would make some statement that I knew was wrong by quoting some fictional source that was not present and I had none of my sources to counter it. It would have ended up as an argument something like.
"Is so",
"Is not",
"Is so",
"Is not",
ad nauseam.

When I see this comeing I usually just break it off and forget about it. If the other person wants to wallow in their ignorance, so be it. Here I am not talking about information where I have just a light casual knowledge but something that I have studied and am very familiar with and am sure of what I know.
SUNLIGHT
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Posted 07/02/12 - 8:32 AM:

thedoc wrote:
Kin, just a brief note of explination, Sun reads the bible literally and has no understanding of Mythology. There is no point in arguing with him, he'll just quote some scripture as the literal and absolute truth. Just take it with a very large dose of salt, and tell him a joke.

............................................
you mean like the drty joke you made about adam and a nun doc ..if kim did that hes no better than you thumb down

thedoc
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Posted 07/02/12 - 9:17 AM:

SUNLIGHT wrote:

............................................
you mean like the drty joke you made about adam and a nun doc ..



I don't remember that one, are you sure it was me and not one that you posted? Could you post it again just to remind me?
libertygrl
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Posted 07/02/12 - 8:05 PM:

Hinduism clearly far surpasses Christianity in terms of written documentation of religious practice, by at least 3,000 years. It may just have to do with favorable ecological factors contributing to the massive bursts of population in those areas.
Thinker13
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Posted 07/04/12 - 3:40 AM:

libertygrl wrote:
Hinduism clearly far surpasses Christianity in terms of written documentation of religious practice, by at least 3,000 years. It may just have to do with favorable ecological factors contributing to the massive bursts of population in those areas.



It's easier to survive in tropical regions I think, especially near rivers where you have access to water, fishes, flora and fauna.
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Posted 07/04/12 - 11:20 AM:

indeed, probably explains too why prominent civilizations where flourishing in the tropical climates of central and south america, giving rise to incan, mayan, and aztec cultures among many others.
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Posted 07/04/12 - 11:50 AM:

libertygrl wrote:
indeed, probably explains too why prominent civilizations where flourishing in the tropical climates of central and south america, giving rise to incan, mayan, and aztec cultures among many others.


But none of their religions survived and became mainstream religions. Did they?
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Posted 07/04/12 - 12:02 PM:

No, mainly because Spain came and forcefully wiped out as much of it as they could and replaced it with Catholicism. However, the Mayan culture and religion is still practiced and growing, some aspects of it now influenced by Catholicism. Other religions merged together with Catholicism to become its own hybrid, for example Santeria.

Part of it, too, has to do with the fact that these religions practiced human sacrifice, which is no longer socially permissible in the world context. Nonetheless, other warfaring religions such as Christianity and Islam have survived, although it appears now that they're waning in popularity. In 1990, 86% of Americans claimed to be Christians. By 2008 it was only 76%. Keeping in mind population growth as well, that is a pretty steady decline. Over that same time period, the number of Americans claiming no religion more than doubled. (Source )
Thinker13
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Posted 07/04/12 - 12:05 PM:

libertygrl wrote:
No, mainly because Spain came and forcefully wiped out as much of it as they could and replaced it with Catholicism. However, the Mayan culture and religion is still practiced and growing, some aspects of it now influenced by Catholicism. Other religions merged together with Catholicism to become its own hybrid, for example Santeria.

Part of it, too, has to do with the fact that these religions practiced human sacrifice, which is no longer socially permissible in the world context. Nonetheless, other warfaring religions such as Christianity and Islam have survived, although it appears now that they're waning in popularity. In 1990, 86% of Americans claimed to be Christians. By 2008 it was only 76%. Keeping in mind population growth as well, that is a pretty steady decline. Over that same time period, the number of Americans claiming no religion more than doubled. (Source )


Interesting information. I had not even heard name "Santeria." I have found that my interest in religions has been increasing since last few days. Starjade and Moon's major are affecting me I think. whee
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Posted 07/04/12 - 12:23 PM:

Back when I was in college, I was required to take a religions class, which I most certainly would not have chosen to do of my own accord. It was very interesting, though, especially when you have an existing interest in storytelling and mythology. Of course, few religions that I know of think of their own belief system as a mythology, but the dominant archetypes are there, clear as day, floating around the collective unconscious and being born and expressed through not only religion but also through our modern entertainment. So I found it fascinating to see all these elements in common. And of course, Joseph Campbell wrote about it extensively too.

Anyway, if you're interested at all in doing some reading about religions, I could recommend our textbook that we used in my college class. It's called "Living Religions", here is the link on Amazon:

www.amazon.com/Living-Relig...&keywords=living+religions

You can buy used copies for only a few dollars. It contains descriptions and histories of the world's religions, with major sections on Hinduism, Jainisim, Buddhism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Sikhism and so on. I have a copy in my home library and like having it around to use as a reference.
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Posted 07/04/12 - 3:15 PM:

libertygrl wrote:
Back when I was in college, I was required to take a religions class, which I most certainly would not have chosen to do of my own accord. It was very interesting, though, especially when you have an existing interest in storytelling and mythology. Of course, few religions that I know of think of their own belief system as a mythology, but the dominant archetypes are there, clear as day, floating around the collective unconscious and being born and expressed through not only religion but also through our modern entertainment. So I found it fascinating to see all these elements in common. And of course, Joseph Campbell wrote about it extensively too.

Anyway, if you're interested at all in doing some reading about religions, I could recommend our textbook that we used in my college class. It's called "Living Religions", here is the link on Amazon:

www.amazon.com/Living-Relig...&keywords=living+religions

You can buy used copies for only a few dollars. It contains descriptions and histories of the world's religions, with major sections on Hinduism, Jainisim, Buddhism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Sikhism and so on. I have a copy in my home library and like having it around to use as a reference.


Did you really read about all of them? What did strike you about Judaism? I know wee bit about all others in your quote, but I wonder if you remember. I know that YHWH, Moses, Talmud, Hebrew, Torah and Kabbalah, Exodus and Living God are connected but nothing 'special,' so it would be great if you recall something which strikes you about Judaism and share with us!
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Posted 07/04/12 - 5:06 PM:

The thing that struck me most about Judaism is their belief that they are God's chosen people. I think most Christians believe that in general, but there is something different about it when it comes to Judaism and I can't quite put my finger on it. If there were really such thing as a favored people on God's part, God's favorite child so to speak, how did they come to be the target of such brutality during the holocaust? What good is it to be God's favored people? It's a mystery to me.
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Posted 07/05/12 - 1:56 AM:

libertygrl wrote:
The thing that struck me most about Judaism is their belief that they are God's chosen people. I think most Christians believe that in general, but there is something different about it when it comes to Judaism and I can't quite put my finger on it. If there were really such thing as a favored people on God's part, God's favorite child so to speak, how did they come to be the target of such brutality during the holocaust? What good is it to be God's favored people? It's a mystery to me.



Could it be that amongst humans, this very belief became the cause of 'hostility' and then ultimately the holocaust. I mean, you cannot really 'distinguish' your religious beliefs from your way of living. If Judaism inspired people to live in an isolated and obnoxious manner and hate others, hatred is what they would get in return. Every religion up to an extent 'instills' this 'prerogative' in its adherents that they're the "only" chosen people. If you look at them as 'memes' some of them are definitely stronger memes and more likely to survive and spread amongst humans.
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Posted 07/05/12 - 9:08 AM:

Could it be that amongst humans, this very belief became the cause of 'hostility' and then ultimately the holocaust.

Well, it's a sensitive question, like suggesting that a rape victim did something to be at fault for the violence when ultimately, it is the perpetrator of the violence who is responsible. But do I believe that their attitude bred some hostility in people? I absolutely can imagine it so. Not so much that they deserved to be slaughtered for it. shaking head But the question is stil there in my mind, though, of what favors exactly does the Jewish or Christian God confer upon his chosen people.
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Posted 07/06/12 - 8:47 AM:

Well if his people remain faithful to him he settles them in their land and makes them prosper and overcomes all their enemiessmiling face
libertygrl
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Posted 07/06/12 - 9:41 AM:

Ah yes, I recall that many Christians, and presumably Jews as well, see it as an honor and a duty to have their faith tested. Those who pass the test are to be rewarded. "Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness’ sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.” Psalms 95:1-7

Well, if that's how they see it, can it be said that all wickedness is just a tool on God's part to test people's faith? And if so, then there really is no evil in the world, except by God's hand. This is a topic on which Alan Watts has written as well. Hm, I think I will start a new topic about this.
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Posted 07/06/12 - 11:01 PM:

libertygrl wrote:
Back when I was in college, I was required to take a religions class, which I most certainly would not have chosen to do of my own accord. It was very interesting, though, especially when you have an existing interest in storytelling and mythology. Of course, few religions that I know of think of their own belief system as a mythology, but the dominant archetypes are there, clear as day, floating around the collective unconscious and being born and expressed through not only religion but also through our modern entertainment. So I found it fascinating to see all these elements in common. And of course, Joseph Campbell wrote about it extensively too.

Anyway, if you're interested at all in doing some reading about religions, I could recommend our textbook that we used in my college class. It's called "Living Religions", here is the link on Amazon:

www.amazon.com/Living-Relig...&keywords=living+religions

You can buy used copies for only a few dollars. It contains descriptions and histories of the world's religions, with major sections on Hinduism, Jainisim, Buddhism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Sikhism and so on. I have a copy in my home library and like having it around to use as a reference.



From my own experience I would advise extreme caution in reading the description of a religion by one who is not a practicioner of that religion. One who is outside the particular religion in question will usually paint a negative picture of that religion.

For example, anyone outside Christianity, could easily conclude that all Christians are Idol Worshipers, by observing a typical Christian service, without digging into the meaning behind the activities in question.
Thinker13
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Posted 07/07/12 - 2:49 PM:

libertygrl wrote:

Well, it's a sensitive question, like suggesting that a rape victim did something to be at fault for the violence when ultimately, it is the perpetrator of the violence who is responsible. But do I believe that their attitude bred some hostility in people? I absolutely can imagine it so. Not so much that they deserved to be slaughtered for it. shaking head But the question is stil there in my mind, though, of what favors exactly does the Jewish or Christian God confer upon his chosen people.



It's sensitive if you take it as an ultimate cause.

I was not insinuating that a rape happens just because a woman is half clad in transparent clothes. No, it cannot be a 'cause' for a crime like rape--but it could well be an 'incentive' and a 'trigger' which in certain situation might cause a crime and likewise.

I don't believe that it's the person who commits crime who is really responsible. It's the system, the nature, the universe and the God and everything allows everything else to be.

It's 'locality' defined by you which allows you to decide about 'causes and effects.'

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