The Couch

Sophism

Comments on Sophism

Thinker13
Senior Member
Avatar

Usergroup: Members
Joined: Apr 27, 2009

Total Topics: 357
Total Comments: 3379
Posted 10/05/11 - 12:41 PM:
Subject: Sophism
In ancient Greece, a philosopher used to inculcate ‘art of argumentation’. He was such an accomplished master of his profession that he offered pupils to pay him fees only if they win their first argument with anyone; more than that he started offering double the amount of his fees as a promotion program to anyone who lost his first argument with anyone after having spent enough time under his tutelage. The amazing thing was: he never had to pay back to any disciple and he always got his fees because of his impeccable teaching.

A very curious looking disciple joined him one day. He was very quiet and refined in appearance. He was very taciturn and rarely asked any questions. He mastered the art of argumentation at a great rate. When the day of examination came, to the astonishment of entire country- disciple challenged the Guru, instead of challenging anyone else. Guru could not reject the challenge, because, in that case his reputation would have got spoiled.

The disciple alleged that he did not owe any money to the Guru. The Guru had an unforeseen dilemma before him. If he would have refuted the assertion and won the argument he would have been compelled to part with the fame that years upon years of Sophistry had earned him and had he lost the argument he would have paid twice the amount he was going to take from his disciple as fees.


Guru surrendered after pondering for a while and disciple went away with money as well as Sophistry in his baggage.
thedoc
Senior Member
Avatar

Usergroup: Members
Joined: Sep 15, 2011

Total Topics: 41
Total Comments: 982
Avatar thedoc
1 of 1 people found this comment helpful
Posted 10/05/11 - 7:17 PM:

So it seems that self-aggrandizement and pride can be defeated by a trick question.

Have you ever read 'The Philosopher's Alice'? I had a hardcover edition from the 70's till several years ago, they're a lot more expensive now.
Thinker13
Senior Member
Avatar

Usergroup: Members
Joined: Apr 27, 2009

Total Topics: 357
Total Comments: 3379
Posted 10/05/11 - 11:52 PM:

thedoc wrote:
So it seems that self-aggrandizement and pride can be defeated by a trick question.

Have you ever read 'The Philosopher's Alice'? I had a hardcover edition from the 70's till several years ago, they're a lot more expensive now.


Yes, it seems so.

I have not read the book mentioned. What is it about?
thedoc
Senior Member
Avatar

Usergroup: Members
Joined: Sep 15, 2011

Total Topics: 41
Total Comments: 982
Avatar thedoc
Posted 10/06/11 - 4:16 PM:

It's about 'Alice in Wonderland' and 'Through the Looking Glass', a phylosophical analysis of the work with the text on one half of the page and an explination on the other half. There is a description of the references Carroll made about the society he lived in, even though it was a story for children, there seemed to be many references intended for the adults who might read it to their children. In a way it reminds me of some of the childrens shows on PBS that taught lessons to young kids but had elements that only an older person would appreciate and maybe get a laugh from.
Thinker13
Senior Member
Avatar

Usergroup: Members
Joined: Apr 27, 2009

Total Topics: 357
Total Comments: 3379
Posted 10/07/11 - 7:21 AM:

thedoc wrote:
It's about 'Alice in Wonderland' and 'Through the Looking Glass', a phylosophical analysis of the work with the text on one half of the page and an explination on the other half. There is a description of the references Carroll made about the society he lived in, even though it was a story for children, there seemed to be many references intended for the adults who might read it to their children. In a way it reminds me of some of the childrens shows on PBS that taught lessons to young kids but had elements that only an older person would appreciate and maybe get a laugh from.



Aww, I love interpretations, but, more often than not they kill innocence, creativity and mystery!
thedoc
Senior Member
Avatar

Usergroup: Members
Joined: Sep 15, 2011

Total Topics: 41
Total Comments: 982
Avatar thedoc
Posted 10/07/11 - 8:48 AM:

Thinker13 wrote:



Aww, I love interpretations, but, more often than not they kill innocence, creativity and mystery!



Yes but usually the child will not even understand the interpretation and it will be left for the adult to fine the meaning. I'm thinking of the conversation between Alice and the King where Alice is asked if she can see anyone coming along the road, to which she replys "I see no-one on the road", and the King replys, "what eyes you must have, to be able to see 'no-one' on the road, I have trouble just seeing 'someone' on the road. Implying that 'no-one' was an individual who was difficult to see, and it was easier to see 'someone', a little play on words.
Thinker13
Senior Member
Avatar

Usergroup: Members
Joined: Apr 27, 2009

Total Topics: 357
Total Comments: 3379
Posted 10/07/11 - 12:56 PM:

I would like to offer another interpretation ( It might not necessarily be in sync with Lewis Carol or anyone else)

Seeing 'No-one' suggests proclivity to see 'space'.

Seeing 'Some-one' suggests a tendency to see 'objects in space'.


Some of us witness just objects and some of us witness space which allows objects to be; in fact all of us notice both of these but the degree of awareness of one over the other varies from person to person.


By this interpretation, king was appreciating subtle awareness of Alice IMO.

Search thread for
Download thread as
  • 100/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5



Sorry, you don't have permission . Log in, or register if you haven't yet.



Acknowledgements:

Couch logo design by Midnight_Monk. The photo hanging above the couch was taken by Paul.

Powered by WSN Forum. Free smileys here.
Special thanks to Maria Cristina, Jesse , Echolist Directory, The Star Online,
Hosting Free Webs, and dmoz.org for referring visitors to this site!

Copyright notice:

Except where noted otherwise, copyright belongs to respective authors
for artwork, photography and text posted in this forum.