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Jealousy

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libertygrl
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Posted 08/25/11 - 2:41 PM:
Subject: Jealousy
What is it good for?

Does it serve some biological compulsion?

Any thoughts?
Morgena
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Posted 08/26/11 - 9:37 AM:

For me jealousy is a sign that the person has a low self-esteem, therefore it have nothing to do with any sort of biological compulsion.


A jealous person is rather comparing herself with her vis-à- vis and realising that she doesn’t compare at all.
cripes
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Posted 08/27/11 - 2:27 PM:

It's [jealousy] either an emotional short circuiting in the brain or something that's evolved over a long period of time. I'd go with the latter myself because so many of us experience it.

If I'm correct, then it stands to reason that jealousy, like any other emotion, has served in the survival and/or reproduction of the species in the past.

The question I ask is; have these emotions become outdated? Do they still serve the species well as a society where we're living on top of one another?

What about behavioral medications, could they be useful if they were developed correctly and administered wisely? How about marijuana, does it in fact do much of what pharmaceutical companies are attempting to achieve?

Jealousy appears to be an emotion that serves selfish interests. Does selfishness serve the whole?
Morgena
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Posted 08/29/11 - 4:11 AM:

I would call it a learned behaviour trait ;-)
cripes
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Posted 08/29/11 - 7:54 AM:

Morgena wrote:
I would call it a learned behaviour trait ;-)
I agree in that we do learn some of what we are to become emotional of. That's when we try to justify our emotional behavior. It plays out constantly and what television soap operas are based on.

"You're not angry at what so-and-so said? You should be."

"Wasn't that funny? Why didn't you laugh?"

"You're feeling a little jealous, sweetie, it'll pass."

We're born with emotion, applying it is the learned part. Psychologists and other counselors teach people to give their feelings a name so as to identify with the emotion.


Edited by cripes on 08/29/11 - 8:09 AM
libertygrl
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Posted 08/29/11 - 12:19 PM:

cripes wrote:
If I'm correct, then it stands to reason that jealousy, like any other emotion, has served in the survival and/or reproduction of the species in the past.

i do agree with morgena that low self-esteem can breed and feed jealousy, but i wonder if it's also a mechanism that humans have developed in order to preserve institutions of monogamous relationships (particularly for the stability of raising children).

i wonder if polygamous or polyamorous people ever get jealous?

Edited by libertygrl on 08/29/11 - 3:33 PM
libertygrl
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Posted 08/29/11 - 12:25 PM:

cripes wrote:
What about behavioral medications, could they be useful if they were developed correctly and administered wisely? How about marijuana, does it in fact do much of what pharmaceutical companies are attempting to achieve?

or other drugs, such as ecstasy or psilocybin?

a related link:
healthland.time.com/2011/06...ological-health-long-term/
libertygrl
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Posted 08/29/11 - 12:27 PM:

another related question: are jealousy and envy facets of the same mechanism? food for thought.
cripes
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Posted 08/29/11 - 7:48 PM:

libertygrl wrote:
another related question: are jealousy and envy facets of the same mechanism? food for thought.
It seems to me both jealousy and envy drive one to either: 1) better oneself (stories of human interest and achievement), or: 2) rid oneself of the competition (Jeffrey Dahmer).

Either way, it's sinful (to introduce religion into the thread). On second thought, let's not! laughing
Morgena
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Posted 08/30/11 - 4:28 AM:

Well, well over here in the UK I’ve watched some women getting jealous if the other got a new care, because those women did define their value through their belongings, a very dangerous way as far as I understand. What would happen if they lose all those things, which make them valuable in their society?

confused
smokinpristiformis
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Posted 08/31/11 - 4:56 AM:

jealousy seems to be an instinctive, evolutionary/genetically hard-wire trait.

To be sure, not all that is genetically hard-wired is good. We spend a lot of time nullifying or ignoring our hard-wiring. And rightly so.
libertygrl
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Posted 08/31/11 - 10:26 PM:

the funny thing about jealousy is that certain things will trigger it and other things not. perhaps with a person who has very low self-esteem and is extremely insecure, almost anything will trigger jealousy (and envy). but speaking for myself, for example, when i'm in a relationship, certain people may make me feel threatened while others don't. most people i know probably don't feel jealous all the time, but jealousy may be triggered on occasion by specific individuals.

it seems to be, in that case, a subconsciously competitive issue.
Morgena
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Posted 09/01/11 - 3:12 AM:

And I would be interested, if there is survey done about nationality and jealousy and envy? ;-)

For exampl, if people from the middle easy are rather more jealous and aggressive than those living in other countries.
smokinpristiformis
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Posted 09/02/11 - 3:25 AM:

Morgena wrote:
And I would be interested, if there is survey done about nationality and jealousy and envy? ;-)

For exampl, if people from the middle easy are rather more jealous and aggressive than those living in other countries.



There's a bit of strange connections you made, Morgena, if you don't mind me saying so. Nationalism doesn't seem to be directly related to jealousy, to me at least. Quite the opposite, even. Jealousy doesn't necessarily to lead to aggression, aggression certainly doesn't need to be caused by jealousy.


With regard to the Middle East, there is one thing that I can think of that relates to the subject and does have a geographical component: (economic, juristic,..) inequality. Countries with extreme inequality (such as South-Africa, and obviously many others), where extreme poverty and extreme wealth are seperated by meters rather than kilomethers, obviously generate huge frustrations and, in many cases, theft or violence. This, I wouldn't attribute to jealousy, but rather to injustice.

Aggression and violence can very well be rooted in (extreme) frustration, (extreme) injustice and (extreme) nationalism. I won't argue with that. But how does the situation in the Middle East relate to jealousy? I do think the Middle East is quite a different situation altogether.


To be sure, if any studies were available on the subject, I would be interested to learn how strongly jealousy is related to socio-economic insecurity, lack of education, ... and how much is character or perhaps genetic.
Morgena
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Posted 09/02/11 - 4:43 AM:

smokinpristiformis wrote:



There's a bit of strange connections you made, Morgena, if you don't mind me saying so. Nationalism doesn't seem to be directly related to jealousy, to me at least. Quite the opposite, even. Jealousy doesn't necessarily to lead to aggression, aggression certainly doesn't need to be caused by jealousy.


With regard to the Middle East, there is one thing that I can think of that relates to the subject and does have a geographical component: (economic, juristic,..) inequality. Countries with extreme inequality (such as South-Africa, and obviously many others), where extreme poverty and extreme wealth are seperated by meters rather than kilomethers, obviously generate huge frustrations and, in many cases, theft or violence. This, I wouldn't attribute to jealousy, but rather to injustice.

Aggression and violence can very well be rooted in (extreme) frustration, (extreme) injustice and (extreme) nationalism. I won't argue with that. But how does the situation in the Middle East relate to jealousy? I do think the Middle East is quite a different situation altogether.


To be sure, if any studies were available on the subject, I would be interested to learn how strongly jealousy is related to socio-economic insecurity, lack of education, ... and how much is character or perhaps genetic.




Well, I came across this book, as part of my research into female aggression, and did some interviews with foreign women over here in the UK. The result of those interviews were as such, that most of the foreign women agreed, as far as they had experienced, English women had a much higher level of aggression than those from other nations.

A very sad outcome :-(

However, I would like to mention, that there are a lot of women over here displaying a sort of hidden aggression, also called verbal aggression.



http://www.vasa.abo.fi/svf/up/mw.htm

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