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Death's Hand on Plant

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hyena in petticoat
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Posted 11/19/08 - 2:06 AM:
Subject: Death's Hand on Plant
Again, it seems I have "murdered" another plant. And it is now in the brink of dying. crying

I don't know why I seem unable to save them. Half of a pot of mums is wilted already and the other plant is slowly drying up. What could I have done wrong? I water it everyday, I talk to it, I tell it to fight to live crying

I like having plants around. It's a shame they seldom survive my tender loving care. :(
hyena in petticoat
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Posted 11/19/08 - 2:53 AM:


libertygrl
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Posted 11/19/08 - 10:15 AM:

they might be getting too much water smiling face try watering every 2 to 3 days:

answers.yahoo.com/question/...?qid=20070918165949AAVoYTl

hang in there lil mums
Nihil Loc
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Posted 11/19/08 - 11:57 PM:

Whoa! I'm a horticultural student BTW, which comes with a modicum of shame. Mums... hmmm.

The most common problem is either too much or too little water as lib says.

Even though mums are perennials they are often treated as shortlived plants, especially the kind people buy in pots at the store already in bloom. The plant in the picture has lower foliage that is scorched which could be due to a range of soil pathogens (even plant parasitic nematodes) limiting water uptake or due poor human care. Your local water source may also be too blame.

Mums are nice for blooms but there are better and more hardy plants that can keep you company.

I just bought a Miracle Berry plant myself, Synsepalum dulcificum, which is noted for an extraordinary glucoprotein in its fruit that coats your tongue and sweetens acids (citrus, vinegar, wine, et ceterea). The problem is it grows at a snails pace and will take 3 years, with good care, to produce anything.

Graham Norton Show
hyena in petticoat
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Posted 11/20/08 - 12:28 AM:

:(

I've read that indeed, mums are short lived and it does seem that it is quite a sensitive plant for amateur "plant grower" like me. I hope the other healthy pot will not have the same fate.

crying

Any recommendations for not too sensitive plants that are more suitable for tropical climates and amateurish plant growers?

Edited by hyena in petticoat on 11/20/08 - 12:42 AM
Nihil Loc
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Posted 11/21/08 - 12:26 AM:

Difficult to make a suggestion, as a plant should be one you like and grow well in whatever environment you have for it. Many factors play a part in whether or not it does well.

I'd say just germinate some seeds that are available wherever you are -- buy perlite and peat and mix at a ratio of 1:1 by volume and follow sowing directions on packet. Marigolds are nice if they don't smell too strong. Try garden mums again from seed if you can get them.

Some types of ficus and palm can withstand very low light and cool temperatures. There are spathyphyllums, a quintessential low light indoor plant. Pothos (Epipremnum) is also a sort of ubiquitous and traditional pot plant.

Then if your a bit adventurous and risky you could even pot up some Pot (Cannibus sativa).

Best thing is to buy something you like.


hyena in petticoat
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Posted 11/21/08 - 1:35 AM:

I actually have a couple other kinds. Pictures here.

I hope they live.

I liked the mums because they looked cheerful. I like plants that looks alive and cheery. Maybe I'll just visit plant "farms" (whatever it's called).

Thank you very much.

I think I'll be saying goodbye to the unhealthy pot of mums real soon.
Paul
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Posted 11/23/08 - 1:52 AM:

You can't use such a dramatic, fascinating title and then spend the thread talking botany. :( I demand a story about death's hand, or at least an illustration of it.

Back when I had usable windowsills I found that miniature cacti were the only things good at surviving my total neglect of them.
libertygrl
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Posted 11/23/08 - 1:11 PM:

indeed, it's very difficult to kill cacti, unless they have mealy bugs, which are even more difficult to kill even when you're trying to.
hyena in petticoat
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#10 - Quote - Permalink
Posted 11/24/08 - 12:16 AM:

But, cacti looks menacing.

hyena in petticoat
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Posted 11/25/08 - 9:33 PM:

My other plants (aside from mums). I don't know what they're called.

http://gallery.philosophyforums.com/albums.php?catid=89
Paul
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Posted 11/26/08 - 3:09 PM:

Less menacing:


I'll admit they're no fun to hug, though.
Nihil Loc
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Posted 11/26/08 - 5:25 PM:

Hyena in Petticoat wrote:
My other plants (aside from mums). I don't know what they're called.

http://gallery.philosophyforums.com/albums.php?catid=89


They look like Sansevieria, commonly known as mother-in-law's tongue.
hyena in petticoat
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Posted 12/02/08 - 11:56 PM:

Paul wrote:
Less menacing:


Err...Not really. That's a very lame attempt to look "nice". grin


NL wrote:
hey look like Sansevieria, commonly known as mother-in-law's tongue.


I can sort of see why. sticking out tongue

hyena in petticoat
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Posted 12/03/08 - 1:01 AM:

Mum update:


hyena in petticoat
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Posted 06/03/09 - 2:12 AM:

New plants and the survivors in their new pots.

http://gallery.philosophyforums.com/thread/887/

http://gallery.philosophyforums.com/thread/886/

http://gallery.philosophyforums.com/thread/885/

http://gallery.philosophyforums.com/thread/884/

http://gallery.philosophyforums.com/thread/883/
Nihil Loc
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Posted 06/03/09 - 1:58 PM:

Hyena,

Nice. What is that tall spindly looking plant at the end. Looks archaic or ferny.
libertygrl
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Posted 06/03/09 - 3:37 PM:

i love the color composition with those blue pillars in the photo, especially 887 thumb up
hyena in petticoat
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Posted 06/03/09 - 8:54 PM:

@ NL: It's something with the "brave" word in its name. I'll do research. smiling face

Thanks lib. grin
smokinpristiformis
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Posted 06/04/09 - 10:50 AM:

nice one Paul ! grin
Nihil Loc
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Posted 06/04/09 - 2:06 PM:

Hibisicus Graft

Here is a pic of a hopefully successful graft I've ddid about ten days ago.

Plant surgery is fun.

Thinker13
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#22 - Quote - Permalink
Posted 06/04/09 - 2:17 PM:

Nihil Loc wrote:
Hibisicus Graft

Here is a pic of a hopefully successful graft I've ddid about ten days ago.

Plant surgery is fun.




Hi Nihil_loc. Is hibiscus a scion in the picture? Then what has been used as a stock? Would you like to describe a bit the process used by you ?


Thank You


Edited by Thinker13 on 06/04/09 - 2:58 PM
Nihil Loc
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Posted 06/04/09 - 2:42 PM:

Ten days ago.

The scion is the bud wood on the right with the little green leaf sticking out. Not much of the rootstock is visible except for the stem onto which the scion is grafted.

The stuff that looks like glue in the middle is fresh vascular tissue that has grown in to seal the graft.

I think you'd call the graft technique I used a side veneer method.

Some rules of thumb for grafting:

Only dicots can be grafted, which means woody plants with pith and bark.
The more closely related the two species the better chance of success but even then some genera just don't.
You need to get the cambium layer of both pieces (scion and rootstock to line up). This is the green layer where hard wood pith meets bark.
Secure the graft with a rubber band and wrap it with an elastic sliver of plastic bag to keep in the moisture (keep humidity around graft high).

Here is another graft which was supposed to be a whip and tongue. Messy but it worked.

Hibiscus Graft 2

Edited by Nihil Loc on 06/04/09 - 2:58 PM
Thinker13
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Posted 06/04/09 - 3:07 PM:

Nihil Loc wrote:
Ten days ago.

The scion is the bud wood on the right with the little green leaf sticking out. Not much of the rootstock is visible except for the stem onto which the scion is grafted.

The stuff that looks like glue in the middle is fresh vascular tissue that has grown in to seal the graft.

I think you'd call the graft technique I used a side veneer method.

Some rules of thumb for grafting:

Only dicots can be grafted, which means woody plants with pith and bark.
The more closely related the two species the better chance of success but even then some genera just don't.
You need to get the cambium layer of both pieces (scion and rootstock to line up). This is the green layer where hard wood pith meets bark.
Secure the graft with a rubber band and wrap it with an elastic sliver of plastic bag to keep in the moisture (keep humidity around graft high).

Here is another graft which was supposed to be a whip and tongue. Messy but it worked.

Hibiscus Graft 2



Good information. Is Grafting a type of cross-breeding? Is it a type of external engineering,where as genetic engineering is more complex and intrinsic in nature?



Thank You
Nihil Loc
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#25 - Quote - Permalink
Posted 06/04/09 - 3:42 PM:

Thinker13 wrote:
Is Grafting a type of cross-breeding? Is it a type of external engineering,where as genetic engineering is more complex and intrinsic in nature?


Grafting is not a type of cross-breeding or genetic engineering. Not sure what you mean by GE being intrinsic in nature, though crown gall (Agrobacterium tumefasciens) modifies its host's genetics at the infection site and is often given as an example of naturally occurring genetic modification (plants playing God).

Grafting is a very old technique. What you see is what you get. Piece X cut from plant X is put on to closely related plant Z; X now grows on Plant Z. It is important to fruit growers since scion varieties we like often may be more venerable to soil born diseases. The rootstock often protect the scion from such diseases. Some rootstocks dwarf the vertical growth of the scion, so the plant fruits lower the ground.
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